Tag Archives | teaching

burst water pipe

Reviewing ITE – are we asking the right questions?

…Let’s start a serious conversation about retention and teacher development, to stop the wholesale wastage of expertise in both schools and universities to which the current situation is leading and to show that we are serious about sustainable, long-term investment in the thing that matters – the quality of teaching in schools.

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Ralph Leighton

Testament Interview with Ralph Leighton – Part 3

This is the final part of three short segments of an interview with Ralph Leighton who is a teacher educator who has been involved in the development of citizenship as a subject. In Part Three Ralph talks frankly about challenges he has faced so far and his key influences including Postman and Weingartner’s ‘Teaching as […]

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Union flag tongue

Teaching foreign languages in primary schools: have we learned our lessons?

England is ranked the worst country in Europe for the level of acquisition of foreign languages amongst teenagers. And yet for decades, English schools have tried to improve this situation, perhaps most notably through experimenting with teaching modern foreign languages in primary schools (PMFL). Clearly, something has gone wrong…

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red triangular road sign with two way arrows

Evidence-informed practice needs practice-based enquiry

Ben Goldacre’s recent call for more randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in education has renewed interest in evidence-based or -informed practice. Large-scale syntheses of existing studies, such as John Hattie’s, have also become popular reading. While such evidence is thought to tell us ‘what works best’, it does not always reveal why. It is also not […]

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Ford car assembly line

The Dehumanisation of Teachers

My point..is the highly detrimental effect the high accountability and data-driven regime is having on schools and on education…I’d like to look at a process that I think is particularly damaging. The process comes from the constant need for schools to show ‘progress’ and for pupils to take a childhood-ignoring upward path to ever greater […]

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