Tag Archives | Gove

tangled cables

Should we review the impact of radical unpredictability in ITE?

The Carter Review comes after a radical restructuring of the ITE funding mechanism, giving much more money to schools and incentivising them to train their own teachers alongside traditional university-led routes into teaching…It’s interesting to speculate what such a report might have said four years ago. At that time the DfE could have taken a […]

Continue Reading ·
burst water pipe

Reviewing ITE – are we asking the right questions?

…Let’s start a serious conversation about retention and teacher development, to stop the wholesale wastage of expertise in both schools and universities to which the current situation is leading and to show that we are serious about sustainable, long-term investment in the thing that matters – the quality of teaching in schools.

Continue Reading ·
Michael Gove in classroom

The Legacy of Michael Gove – the Fast Food Education System

After four turbulent years in charge, Michael Gove is no longer the Secretary of State for Education….In political terms, what Gove achieved in office was remarkable and makes him possibly the stand out minister of the coalition government. However, political success must not be confused with educational success. Thanks to his rush, instead of creating […]

Continue Reading ·
economic words

Master or Servant? The Error of Personalising Radical Unpopular Change in Schooling in England

To many in the teaching profession Michael Gove generates deep seated animosity. However, Andrew Lambirth, Professor of Education at the University of Greenwich, argues here that these feelings dangerously miss the point, and that teachers need to focus their attention far more heavily on the economy, not personality. Since the advent of the Conservative Party […]

Continue Reading ·
Spiral staircase

The view from my ivory tower: a response

On March 19th I was one of the one hundred signatories of a letter suggesting that the draft curriculum was too dependent on dry facts, over-prescriptive, untrusting of teachers and narrow. We feared such a curriculum would demotivate many children by failing to develop their interests, hamper their ability to think critically and creatively and […]

Continue Reading ·